Simon A. Andrew

Dr. Simon Andrew
Dr.
Simon
A.
Andrew
Associate Professor
Office: 
Chilton Hall 204A
Office Hours: 
M: 3:00-5:00pm or by appointment
Phone: 
940.565.4982
Courses 
  • PADM 2100, Diversity in Urban Governance
  • PADM 3000, Introduction to Public Administration
  • PADM 4450, Public Policy Analysis
  • PADM 5010, Public Administration and Society (Fall & Spring)
  • PADM 5310, Economic and Community Development
  • PADM 5510, Public Administration Research Methods II (Fall & Spring)
  • PADM 5550, Seminar in Program Evaluation
  • PADM 5700, Economic Development in Disasters
  • PADM 6010, Seminar in Public Administration (Fall)
  • PADM 6110, Seminar in Public Management I (Fall)
  • PADM 6120, Seminar in Public Management II
Education 
  • Ph.D., Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • MPA, Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi, Texas
  • M.A., University of East Anglia, Norwich (England)
  • B.A., University of East Anglia, Norwich (England)
Biography 

Simon A. Andrew received his BA with honors and Master of Arts in Development Economics from the University of East Anglia (England). He graduated with an MPA and Ph.D. from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and Florida State University respectively. He was the recipient of the DeVoe Moore Fellow in 2006 and the first UNT scholar to receive the Paul Volcker Junior Scholar Endowment awarded by APSA in 2007. He has received grant awards from the National Science Foundation (RAPID), Dallas Area Habitat for Humanity, and Charn Uswachoke Award Fund (UNT). What sets Professor Andrew’s work apart from most research in the field of regional governance is the level of analytical rigor—using SIENA—a sophisticated social network modeling tool to bear on interjurisdictional relations and bring insights from the Institutional Collective Action (ICA) framework that aims to explain the circumstances that drive intergovernmental collaborations and the types of collaborations that are most likely to be successful. His most recent work with Sudha Arlikatti examines patterns of housing recovery, resettlement programs, and organizational resiliency in India, Thailand, and South Korea.